Back You are here: Home Reviews Live Review: Millions, Jesse Davidson, The Furrs @ Black Bear Lodge 22.08.14

Live Review: Millions, Jesse Davidson, The Furrs @ Black Bear Lodge 22.08.14

Brisbane’s indie sweethearts-of-the-moment Millions were playing tonight and I wasn’t quite sure what all the fuss was about. So I thought I should get on down to Black Bear Lodge and find out for myself. Though I will admit, if it wasn’t for The Furrs, I wouldn’t have been too sad to miss it.As I walked into the venue I was greeted by some solid, jam-worthy grooves, courtesy of Alex and Stag of Moses Gunn Collective. Gabriella pours out cryptic, heartfelt lyrics over the top of it all with her distinctive, smoky voice. The Jim Morrison influence in her performance is unmistakable, seemingly unable to control her motions as her guitar churns out riffs that’ll stay with you for days. The crowd may be small but they are insatiable, dancing merrily and constantly calling out for more until The Furrs come to end, just as loosely as they started. Definitely stay tuned to see what these guys get up to.

Millions. Photo: Dean Swindell

Next to take the stage is Adelaide’s Jesse Davidson. Jesse is about as unassuming and awkward
a frontman as you’ll ever come across; hair hanging across his face, glasses dangling on the
end of his nose and almost incapable of talking in more than a mumble, there’s probably a
certain charm to it all that’s lost on me. I do however take notice of his unexpectedly sweet
voice. Together with his undeniably awesome guitar tone and his knack for writing an
excellent pop hook, Jesse is easy enough to like if you’re not afraid of Jonathon Boulet style
pop and a touch of distortion. After their drummer tries and fails to do numerous impressions
(Brooklyn male ordering coffee was probably the anti-highlight), all of which Jesse thankfully
cut short before I strangled myself, they break into a cover of James Blake’s hit The Wilhelm
Scream. The indie rock infused cover strips away the abstraction and turns it into something
dark, intimate and personal, quite a pleasant surprise. Before they finish the set, the drummer
pulls out a trumpet in a slow section and plays a beautiful, heartfelt solo far better than his
drumming capabilities would have let on. I guess he just learnt drums so he could play in a
rock band. Despite the nice tunes, the venue isn’t even near capacity, clearly people don’t care
about anything but Millions.

Jesse Davidson. Photo: Dean Swindell

Finally it is the time for the boys to do their thing and they appear dressed all in white
skivvies with a four on the floor dance number. The fashion choice takes all the slinky sex
appeal away from the four piece which is definitely a loss in my mind but apparently not for
the suddenly packed out venue full of rabid fans. Before the first song is over I am shoved out
of the way at least three times as punters claw each other for the prime Instagram worthy
spot and I soon had to resort to giving out the crazy eye. It worked particularly well on one
girl trying to push past me with her butt who forgot her excuse for doing so mid-sentence
upon making eye contact. Millions make their way through the set with some nice guitar
melodies and enough pop sensibility to mask their singers limited vocal range without too
much hassle but unfortunately there isn’t really too much to get excited about.

Millions. Photo: Dean Swindell

My personal highlight was when the trumpet player from Jesse Davidson came up for a song
and grinded through the parts he didn’t play in spectacular fashion, adding some much
needed sleaze and sonic variation. I couldn’t take my eyes off him even if I wanted to. As soon
as he left the stage I was craving some other sort of change up; interesting textures, some rock
abandon, at least some vulnerability. Even that supposed ‘old world charm’ they’re meant to
possess only comes out in their latest single (the first song with an actual vocal melody) and a
cover of Unchained Melody by The Righteous Brothers. This is when the band really starts to
make sense: when the singer looks like he’s actually enjoying himself and makes use of his delicate falsetto, when the sounds they use meld together and cause the crowd to forget where they are and sway with each other.

Millions. Photo: Dean Swindell

While they might’ve been the perfect cover band for that one prom scene in Back To The
Future, at the moment Millions are just another indie-pop band from Brisbane with a handy
connection to Glenn Tilbrook.

Related Articles

Our Community

  • Facebook
  • instagram
  • Twitter
  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Google+

Contact Us

  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.