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Movie Review: The Internship

A little ball of sunshine sent down from the Googleplex to make us feel all warm and fuzzy inside. That pretty much sums up the new Vince Vaughn-Owen Wilson comedy, The Internship.

Filled with life lessons, reminiscent of a children’s movie, and geeky yet endearing characters, The Internship could easily fall into the “too cheesy” category.

But it doesn’t.

Starring comedic duo Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson, the film follows recently unemployed salesmen Billy McMahon (Vaughn) and Nick Campbell (Owen).  

“Dinosaurs” in a world dominated by tech-savvy gen-Yers, the pair manage to talk their way into a summer internship at Google.

Despite copious amounts of enthusiasm, their age and lack of IT experience leave Billy and Nick as obvious misfits.

They’re thrown together with the other “outliers” – Neha, who disguises her relationship inexperience with a boisterous personality; Stuart, who thinks he’s too cool to care; and Yo-Yo, emotionally scarred by a heavy-handed mother.

Guided by their young and socially awkward manager Lyle, the team undergoes a number of challenges in a battle to win coveted jobs at Google.   

Over the summer, Billy and Nick become role models for their fellow “Nooglers”, using their life experience to show the youngsters what life is really like beyond the computer screen.

Vaughn and Wilson are dynamic once again, displaying the comedic chemistry which made Wedding Crashers a hit.

The movie caters for pretty much everyone, with references to Alanis Morissette, Flash Dance, Harry Potter aswell as cosplay and Star Wars.

There are bound to be jokes which go over your head, whether it’s due to your age or lack of computer knowledgeability. 

While Google branding features prominently throughout the film, including some cameos by co-founder Sergey Brin, it certainly doesn’t feel like a sales pitch. 

There are a few jokes which don’t quite hit the mark. But then again, if you’re a guy in your late teens to early thirties, you’ll probably still get a kick out of it. 

It may not be one to take young kids to, thanks to a scene somewhat reminiscent of The Hangover, but it’s worth the two hour escape.    

While there are bound to critics, the movie is designed to entertain. It’s not a behind the scenes look at what it’s like to work for Google. 

Nor should it be compared to films which use artistic licence to portray the debauchery involved in the rise to global domination – viz The Social Network. 

But if you’re simply looking for a reprieve from the gloomy winter weather, this is sure to cheer you up.

Assuming your synapses are still firing, you should experience a pleasant increase in your dopamine levels. (If you don’t know what dopamine is, Google it.)


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